March 14th, 2012
Jeffery Deaver - The Broken WindowThat's what happens in love. In the shaded portions where the two spheres of different lives meet, certain fundamentals -- moods, loves, fears, angers -- can't be hidden. That's the contract.

Sumo Sushi - Rochester, MI

March 9th, 2012

I do not want my sushi cooked. Sumo Sushi offers only a few raw items on its specialty sushi menu and that is a turn off for me. I know many people who don't want raw sushi, and if you are like them, this is your place.

We have been a few times, and I find the sushi generally unremarkable. I did like their Rainbow Roll, which is raw. And their Lobster Roll and Three Musketeers Roll (both cooked) are good. Unfortunately, compared to Sakura which is just up the street, they are probably the only reasons to eat here.

http://sumosushiandseafood.com/

Trunk Music - Michael Connelly

March 8th, 2012

Trunk Music by Michael ConnellyTony Aliso finally had a hit. Stuffed into the trunk of his Rolls on a ragged stretch of Mulholland Drive, the B-movie producer took two bullets to the head -- a kind of job wiseguys call "Trunk Music." LAPD Detective Harry Bosch, hungry for action after an involuntary layoff, catches the case and is soon painstakingly unraveling Aliso's life, times, and ties...from his Mob deals to his beautiful wife to a stripper in Vegas to the disgraced FBI agent who just happens to be Harry's ex-girlfriend. Now somewhere between LA and Las Vegas is the one answer Harry needs. But so are enemies on both sides of the law, the woman he still loves, and the secrets that can break your heart -- or get you killed.

A no-name movie producer is found dead stuffed in the trunk of his own car. He may have been murdered by a business partner from a deal that went south, his estranged wife, his stripper girlfriend, or maybe this murder has more to it than meets the eye. Harry Bosch is back in action and this case has him traveling to Las Vegas and uncovering a complex scheme that has significant ties involving the Mob. It wouldn't be Bosch if everything went smoothly, even though the guy does try to play it level...most of the time. The road blocks he faces this time come in the form of a new boss, The Feds, an old flame and some potentially dirty cops.

This is the fifth book in the series. Harry is a tough pill to swallow at times; he can have a very reckless disregard for personal and professional relationships and certainly for protocol, as well. In the earlier books this is even more prevalent than here, but he is still the same, old Harry. I keep reading them because I do enjoy them. I like how the books are written and I like seeing the progression of Harry's career.

Trunk Music is my favorite of the series so far. I definitely attribute it to Michael Connelly's improvement as a storyteller and I am excited to read them all.

Amazon

March 7th, 2012
Stephen King - On WritingI felt pretty good actually. When you're still too young to shave, optimism is a perfectly legitimate response to failure.

2012 Edgar Nominees

March 6th, 2012
Edgar Awards

Mystery Writers of America is the premier organization for mystery writers, professionals allied to the crime writing field, aspiring crime writers, and those who are devoted to the genre. MWA is dedicated to promoting higher regard for crime writing and recognition and respect for those who write within the genre...

Mystery Writers of America is proud to announce ... the Edgar Allan Poe Awards, honoring the best in mystery fiction, non-fiction, television and film published or produced.
- Mysterywriters.org

- Best Novel -
The Ranger by Ace Atkins
Gone by Mo Hayder
The Devotion of Suspect X by Keigo Higashino
1222 by Anne Holt
Field Gray by Philip Kerr

- Best First Novel -
Red on Red by Edward Conlon
Last to Fold by David Duffy
All Cry Chaos by Leonard Rosen
Bent Road by Lori Roy
Purgatory Chasm by Steve Ulfelder

- Best Paperback Original -
The Company Man by Robert Jackson Bennett
The Faces of Angels by Lucretia Grindle
The Dog Sox by Russell Hill
Death of the Mantis by Michael Stanley
Vienna Twilight by Frank Tallis

- Best Fact Crime -
The Murder of the Century: The Gilded Age Crime That Scandalized a City and Sparked the Tabloid Wars by Paul Collins
The Savage City: Race, Murder, and a Generation on the Edge by T.J. English
Destiny of the Republic: A Tale of Madness, Medicine and the Murder of a President by Candice Millard
Girl, Wanted: The Chase for Sarah Pender by Steve Miller
The Man in the Rockefeller Suit: The Astonishing Rise and Spectacular Fall of a Serial Imposte by Mark Seal

- Best Critical/Biographical -
The Tattooed Girl: The Enigma of Stieg Larsson and the Secrets Behind the Most Compelling Thrillers of our Time by Dan Burstein, Arne de Keijzer & John-Henri Holmberg
Agatha Christie: Murder in the Making by John Curran
On Conan Doyle: Or, the Whole Art of Storytelling by Michael Dirda
Detecting Women: Gender and the Hollywood Detective Film by Philippa Gates
Scripting Hitchcock: Psycho, The Birds and Marnie by Walter Raubicheck and Walter Srebnick

- Best Short Story -
"Marley’s Revolution" by John C. Boland
"Tomorrow’s Dead" by David Dean
"The Adakian Eagle" by Bradley Denton
"Lord John and the Plague of Zombies" by Diana Gabaldon
"The Case of Death and Honey" by Neil Gaiman
"The Man Who Took His Hat Off to the Driver of the Train” by Peter Turnbull

- Best Juvenile -
Horton Halfpott by Tom Angleberger
It Happened on a Train by Mac Barnett
Vanished by Sheela Chari
Icefall by Matthew J. Kirby
The Wizard of Dark Street by Shawn Thomas Odyssey

- Best Young Adult -
Shelter by Harlan Coben
The Name of the Star by Maureen Johnson
The Silence of Murder by Dandi Daley Mackall
The Girl is Murder by Kathryn Miller Haines
Kill You Last by Todd Strasser

- Best Play -
Sherlock Holmes and the Adventure of the Suicide Club by Jeffrey Hatcher
The Game's Afoot by Ken Ludwig

- Best TV Episode -
"Innocence" - Blue Bloods by Siobhan Byrne O’Connor
"The Life Inside" - Justified by Benjamin Cavell
"Part 1" - Whitechapel by Ben Court & Caroline Ip
"Pilot" - Homeland by Alex Gansa, Howard Gordon & Gideon Raff
"Mask" - Law & Order: SVU by Speed Weed

- Mary Higgins Clark Award -
Now You See Me by S.J. Bolton
Come and Find Me by Hallie Ephron
Death on Tour by Janice Hamrick
Learning to Swim by Sara J. Henry
Murder Most Persuasive by Tracy Kiely

March 5th, 2012
Stephen King - On WritingI want to suggest that you write to your best abilities. It behooves you to construct your own toolbox and then build up enough muscle so you can carry it with you. Then, instead of looking at a hard job and getting discouraged, you will perhaps seize the correct tool and get immediately to work.

Calico Joe

March 1st, 2012

Calico Joe by John Grisham

Calico Joe by John GrishamWhatever happened to Calico Joe?

It began quietly enough with a pulled hamstring. The first baseman for the Cubs AAA affiliate in Wichita went down as he rounded third and headed for home. The next day, Jim Hickman, the first baseman for the Cubs, injured his back. The team suddenly needed someone to play first, so they reached down to their AA club in Midland, Texas, and called up a twenty-one-year-old named Joe Castle. He was the hottest player in AA and creating a buzz.

In the summer of 1973 Joe Castle was the boy wonder of baseball, the greatest rookie anyone had ever seen. The kid from Calico Rock, Arkansas dazzled Cub fans as he hit home run after home run, politely tipping his hat to the crowd as he shattered all rookie records.
Calico Joe quickly became the idol of every baseball fan in America, including Paul Tracey, the young son of a hard-partying and hard-throwing Mets pitcher. On the day that Warren Tracey finally faced Calico Joe, Paul was in the stands, rooting for his idol but also for his Dad. Then Warren threw a fastball that would change their lives forever…

In John Grisham’s new novel the baseball is thrilling, but it’s what happens off the field that makes CALICO JOE a classic.

This book will be available on April 10, 2012.

Pre-order your copy.

February 29th, 2012
Michael Connelly - Trunk MusicBosch couldn't get comfortable on the chaise lounge. He didn't understand how people did this, just sit in the sun and bake. He was covered in lotion and there was sand caked between his toes. Eleanor had bought him a red bathing suit that he thought made him look foolish and that made him feel like a target. At least, he thought, it wasn't one of those slingshot things some of the men on the beach were wearing.

Sacré Bleu - Christopher Moore

February 28th, 2012

Sacré Bleu by Christopher MooreIt is the color of the Virgin Mary's cloak, a dazzling pigment desired by artists, an exquisite hue infused with danger, adventure, and perhaps even the supernatural. It is . . .

Sacré Bleu

In July 1890, Vincent van Gogh went into a cornfield and shot himself. Or did he? Why would an artist at the height of his creative powers attempt to take his own life . . . and then walk a mile to a doctor's house for help? Who was the crooked little "color man" Vincent had claimed was stalking him across France? And why had the painter recently become deathly afraid of a certain shade of blue?

These are just a few of the questions confronting Vincent's friends—baker-turned-painter Lucien Lessard and bon vivant Henri Toulouse-Lautrec—who vow to discover the truth about van Gogh's untimely death. Their quest will lead them on a surreal odyssey and brothel-crawl deep into the art world of late nineteenth-century Paris.

Oh là là, quelle surprise, and zut alors! A delectable confection of intrigue, passion, and art history—with cancan girls, baguettes, and fine French cognac thrown in for good measure—Sacré Bleu is another masterpiece of wit and wonder from the one, the only, Christopher Moore.

European painters and the rest of the art world sent the 19th century to a close in style. So many great painters made so many great paintings and Christopher Moore explores the potential that maybe there was more to their combined genius than meets the eye. In Sacré Bleu Moore weaves a satirical web of the super natural and the inspired, tracing the artists and their work back to the "color man."

I am very familiar with the distinctive cover artwork of his previous work, but this was the first book by Mr. Moore that I've read. I thought that setting this story in 1790s Paris and incorporating all of the great painters who worked in that time was an enticing offering.

I can now tell you that it is my opinion that if you like Christopher Moore, you will like books by Tom Robbins and vice versa. I found the styles of the two authors to be very similar. And Sacré Bleu is Tom Robbins meets art history, consider it five parts Fierce Invalids Home From Hot Climates and one part The Da Vinci Code.

I am such a big fan of when a writer is able to work a substantial amount of fact into a work of fiction. I appreciate the work that went into Chris Moore building this work of art around so many other works of art.

Moore is known for his humor and I did not find this book to be particularly funny, but I am a tough critic on humor. There were definitely some parts that made smirk, if not chuckle, but I don't think you should expect to laugh out loud while you read Sacré Bleu.

Overall, I think this book was just ok. I liked the art history lesson, but the writing style that Moore and Tom Robbins share is not one to which I am drawn. If you like that, you will probably get more out of this than I did.

Amazon

February 27th, 2012
Stephen King - On Writing"When you write a story, you're telling yourself the story," he said. "When you rewrite, your main job is taking out all of the things that are not the story."